Beginner’s Guide: The Initial Investment for Outlaw Dirt Kart Racing

So how much does it cost to get started?

Joining the racing community as an entry-level competitor with no previous experience or background in racing takes balls.  Making the initial investment takes commitment.  I’m sure you have already done some Google searches  if you’ve gotten to this point, and you may in fact discovered us after the fact or as a result of finding a used kart package for sale. Maybe you are still in the “kicking the tires” phase and interested in a “ball park” – I created a spreadsheet budget with you in mind based on items that we sell at KAM Karting Supply (now KAM Motorsports). Your basics are the kart and safety gear.

Items where chosen for an entry-level beginner (Hot Wheels) racer in mind and the lower average with in a group was used for the budget price point line items.  

The initial purchase of kart, motor package and safety gear is required to start racing. Everything else can be purchased as you go along.

Going second hand for your first kart is the alternative if your budget doesn’t allow for a brand new set up. 

The best time to look for used karts is at the end of the racing season when kids are moving up in classes.  Email me for a list of places to look online!

You can pick up some good second hand deals, but beware: if it sounds too good (price super low) – then it probably is. You can normally tell how well a kart has been maintained by how it is presented. When evaluating a used package, ask yourself “what more will I have to spend to put it on the track?” Some things to look for when buying used are:

1) Eligibility – Is the kart chassis, engine, tires, etc. suitable for the class you have chosen. TIP: Whether racing at KAM or another track the best place to start is with the class rules to obtain this information.

2) Chassis Brand – There are numerous brands of karts on the market. The brand that KAM sells is “QRC Karts”. Although this is the most popular brand, it is not the “required” brand to race. Just make sure the kart you are purchasing still has parts available for them. A majority of parts on a kart are interchangeable but there are some parts that are specific to each kart.

3) Engine Compatibility – Is the engine right for the class, does it meet track specs (ie:is it “legal”), when was the engine last serviced, do they have any receipts for the work they have had done.

4) Age – For competitive racing you should look for a chassis no older than 4 years old. Older karts may still perform well but may take a lot of work and know-how.       If you are a novice, buying an older chassis could cause more frustration and disappointment than it’s worth. The price of the chassis is reflected by the age of the kart as well as the condition.

5) Chassis Fatigue – If there is any evidence of cracking it is best to avoid the kart. Look under the kart to make sure the kart is not badly worn. Missing paint is normal but if you can see the main rails have been ground it normally means the kart has had a hard life.


 6 Months Same As Cash Offer:

 


  If you find  the spreadsheet above helpful and a potential planning tool that you would like to use – shoot me an email and I will send you the Excel file for you to use and customize or tweak to your hearts desire.  

 

 

Note: some links were updated on 12/16/14

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